Potty training dogs does not have to be an unpleasant experience. If you are aware of problems you may encounter during training you will be better prepared to deal with any mishaps.

Dogs or puppies that have never been taught to eliminate in a designated potty area may tend to answer the call of nature anywhere, including indoors. Some dogs that are put outside and will actually wait until they are allowed into the house where they will proceed to do their business! The dog will then go in a place where it feels it is hidden from view. Potty training dogs can be difficult if they seem to insist on defecating indoors.

However with a little bit of structure and commitment by their owners these dogs can be successfully trained to go outdoors. When potty training this kind of dog, owners should be aware that they need to get their dog to trust them. The dog should never fear their owner and should not be punished for accidents or intentional messes. Potty training dogs requires that the dog feel confident with his owner.

Start potty training dogs with this problem by taking the dog outside on a leash to a designated potty area and wait until he does his business. Even if there is no result continue to take your dog outside first thing in the morning, after meals and before bedtime. This will get your dog used to heading outdoors periodically and nature may help to smooth the way.

A second problem you may encounter when potty training dogs is the dog who scent marks. Dogs who enjoy marking their territory in the house may know what is expected of them but scent mark for hormonal reasons or dominance. Insecure dogs may also scent mark. Dogs put up a scent post to warn other dogs to stay out of their domain. Male dogs are the main culprits.

It may be a good idea to neuter male dogs who scent mark excessively. Follow the same rules as with eliminating indoors. If you catch your dog in the act take him outdoors immediately until he learns to associate lifting his leg with outdoor activity. When potty training dogs never punish them – instead provide them with an alternative behavior.

Submissive urinating is when a dog urinates when he or she gets excited and is common in very young dogs. Your dog may also do this when he is upset or frightened. You should never punish your dog when he does this as it will only make the problem worse. Potty training dogs with a submissive urination problem involves developing good communication skills with your dog.

This may take the form of not greeting your dog in an emotional way, avoiding eyes contact until your dog can understand that you are not a threat and avoiding dominant posturing. Your dog needs to learn to trust you before you move on to potty training. Potty training dogs with this problem is likely to be unsuccessful until you and he have a comfortable relationship.

About Jerry Silverman

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